Which Agency Employees Can Be Exempt Employees for Overtime Pay Purposes?

In last week’s post, I mentioned the concept of exempt and nonexempt employees and provided a brief description of what makes an employee exempt from the requirement under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) that employees be paid extra compensation for any work done in excess of 40 hours per week.  This subject is an important one, as the misclassification of an employee as being exempt when in fact they are not can be very costly to the employer, as explained later in this post.

A few weeks ago, I listened to a webinar that focused on whether certain employees of insurance agencies could be classified as exempt employees.  In particular, what it would take for customer service representatives, or account executives, and producers to be classified as exempt employees.  The presenter discussed in some detail the two main exempt categories that may apply to the former type of employees, known as the executive and administrative employee exemptions.  As noted in last week’s post, at this time, to qualify for either exemption an employee must be paid on a fixed salary basis in an amount that equals at least $455 per week ($23,660 per year) and that salary cannot be reduced based on the quality or quantity of the work performed by the employee during any one work week.

I say at this time because, at the direction of President Obama, the Department of Labor has been reviewing those and the other exemptions from the overtime pay requirement and is expected to release updated regulations for them sometime this Spring. Most knowledgeable commentators expect the minimum salary requirement for the administrative and executive exemptions to be increased significantly.

The most likely exemption for customer service representatives would be the administrative exemption, which requires that the employee’s primary duty be the performance of “office or non-manual work directly related to the management or general business operations of the employer or the employer’s customers” and include the “exercise of discretion and independent judgment with respect to matters of significance” to the employer’s business.  Such employees can engage in some sales activity on behalf of the employer, but that activity cannot be their primary duty. (Click here for a more detailed explanation of the requirements of the administrative exemption.)

For producers, the most likely exemption is one for outside sales persons for the reasons discussed in a 2009 opinion by the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor that focused on life insurance producers, but the language of which would apply equally to property and casualty or health insurance producers.  That exemption requires the employee’s primary duty to be the making of sales or the obtaining of orders for services and they must “customarily and regularly” perform that duty outside of the employer’s place of business, which for this purpose means at the home or office of the customer or potential customer. (Click here for a more detailed explanation of the outside sales person exemption.)

If an agency’s producers don’t meet the second part of the outside sales person exemption, it is possible that they can meet what is known as the commissioned sales person exemption.  That exemption requires that the employee be paid at a rate in excess of the overtime pay rate (at this time $10.88) for every hour worked and that more than half of their total compensation be from commissions. (Click here for a more detailed explanation of the commissioned sales person exemption.)

An employee who was not paid overtime compensation when they should have been has the right to sue the employer in federal court to recover the extra compensation they should have been paid for up to three years before the lawsuit is filed.  In addition, if the employee convinces the court that the employer willfully violated the FLSA, they can receive liquidated damages up to double the amount of extra compensation they should have been paid.  Finally, a successful employee is entitled to an award for the attorney fees and other litigation expenses incurred by them, which award can sometimes be far higher than the amount of extra compensation the employee recovers.  Last year, an employee in Georgia who was awarded a little over $6,500 in extra compensation, also received an attorney fees award of over $173,000.00.  It is easy to see why lawsuits for unpaid overtime compensation are the most frequently filed employment related lawsuits in Georgia and elsewhere.

1 thought on “Which Agency Employees Can Be Exempt Employees for Overtime Pay Purposes?”

  1. Each year around the winter and early Spring when inclement weather hits I am reminded of your blog posts on this topic. Thank you for sharing as this post was once again timely for us here in Georgia.

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